An Unexpected Turn

I returned Sunday evening from the ACFW Conference in Dallas, where I had a wonderful time, as always. I got to hang out with some of my writer friends, met some new people, and learned a number of practical things about indie publishing (which was one of my primary goals). None of that was unexpected.

Just before I left, I published the first three books in the Gateway to Gannah series through IngramSpark. I just now checked on Booktopia, which is Australia’s largest online bookseller, and all three are available there. Or at least, they will be after the release date of October 1. At present, the covers don’t show up—not sure why that is—but you can read the blurbs and other information about the books, and you can also preorder them prior to their official release.

A day or two ago, I completed the process for the fourth book in the series, The Last Toqeph, so it should be available on Booktopia soon. I think it takes about a week.

Here are the links for the first three:

The Story in the Stars
Words in the Wind
Ransom in the Rock

I also found them on the Book Depository site, with Words in the Wind and Ransom in the Rock both 10% off until the release date of October 1. So if you’re in Australia and would like to order them in print, now’s the time to do it! (They’ve always been available on Amazon.com.au in ebook, if that’s the format you prefer.)

And speaking of Australia… yeah. That’s the turn of events I mentioned before. Turns out I’m not going after all. It’s simply not working out the way we’d planned.

Though I’m disappointed, there’s no question it was the right decision to cancel, and I’m good with it. I’ll just try not to think too much about what I’ll be missing…

Meanwhile, I’m looking forward to October here in Ohio. We’ve been having severely summerlike temperatures lately, and it will be delightful when it cools off and starts acting like fall!

I hope to get to my son and daughter-in-law’s house to make some applesauce in a couple of weeks, as she’s champing at the bit to dive into that project. And I have some other fun things in mind to do hereabouts as well.

 

But if I post any pictures from Tasmania, they’ll have to come from some source other than my own camera.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

If Practice Makes Perfect…

…how long do we have to practice before we get it down pat?

Here’s the story:

Quite some time ago, I thought it would be fun to send my Tasmanian friend a copy of The Story in the Stars. Rather than paying to ship it from here in the US, I figured I’d just order it from Amazon.au and have them send it directly to her. Simple, right? Well, imagine my surprise to discover that in Australia, my books are only available on Kindle, not in print.

Turns out CreateSpace has no printing facilities in that part of the world. To have it printed elsewhere and shipped there would be cost-prohibitive, so they don’t offer their print titles in Australia.

This caused me considerable consternation. When we discussed the possibility of helping my friend self-publish her book, we were talking about doing it through CreateSpace. However, it would make no sense to publish on a platform that doesn’t have the ability to print books in the country where she lives.

After making some inquiries, I learned that IngramSpark does have printing facilities in Australia. As I looked into it further, I decided that of all the various self-publishing options out there, that seems to be the best for our situation.

So, once I finished the manuscript for the JS Freeman project and while waiting for the covers to be completed, I decided to do a practice run (or four) with IngramSpark by publishing the Gannah series with them.

Starting with The Story in the Stars, I reviewed the CreateSpace manuscript, looking for errors and little things I wanted to tweak. I assigned it an ASIN and reformatted it for IngramSpark. I created a bar code for the cover and inserted it in the appropriate place. I uploaded the whole thing, it was accepted, and I received an electronic proof.

I didn’t look at the e-proof very closely, though, because I preferred to review it in print. So I ordered a print proof. It didn’t come… it didn’t come… it didn’t come… Finally I looked to see what the hold-up was and discovered I hadn’t completed the process of ordering it. Ah, that explained it… So I ordered a copy of the print proof and did it right, and when it finally arrived, I went through it with a fine-toothed comb.

My description of all this sounds pretty cut-and-dried, but it’s not. I’m not very techy. Through all the process, I ran into various complications, confusions, and frustrations. And I was very glad I’d ordered a print proof, because I found a number of rather substantial things I wanted to change.

Which I did. And then I uploaded the new-and-improved manuscript, only to discover that the cover needs to be changed, because the spine width was no longer sufficient for the number of pages. Argh!

I contacted the cover designer and asked if he’d be able to make that change for me—and while he’s at it, could he add the Gannah’s Gate logo? (That’s the name of the publishing company I established for these purposes.) Sure, he says, no problem – except he couldn’t use the logo in any of the formats I provided him.

Back back and forth with the company that designed the logo – finally got that wrinkle ironed out. But while we’re doing the cover for Stars, I’d better see how many pages the new-and-improved manuscripts will be for the other books in the series, so I can get all the covers appropriately revised. That meant going through each of the other three books carefully and making revisions and adaptations for the IngramSpark platform, then giving the cover designer the page count and spine width requirements for each.

At last, I think all that’s completed, and I think I’m ready to begin the uploading process, followed by examining the proofs, and then taking the plunge and making them available on IngramSpark.

Every step of the way, I feel like I shouldn’t have to struggle with it so much. I’ve self-published books before, right? I’ve done formatting before. I shouldn’t have to work up such a sweat over it. But yet, I do.

I hope by the time I’m ready to go through all this over again with the JS Freeman series (which I plan to do on both IngramSpark and CreateSpace), and eventually my friend’s book, I’ll be more comfortable with it.

They say practice makes perfect, and I’m practicing! I really am! But I don’t anticipate the end result to be perfection. Only God is perfect. I’m just shooting for acceptable.

I’ll keep you apprised as to developments.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

The Tassie Story

After my last post, I was asked if my upcoming trip to Tasmania will be for a writers conference, to visit a fellow writer, or what. The short answer: To visit a fellow writer. But that’s not quite accurate. So in this post, I’ll answer a bit more completely.

How many years has it been since I was the contest coordinator for the Novel Rocket blog? I don’t remember, exactly, but that’s where this story starts. I believe it was the third year of Novel Rocket’s Launch Pad contest that we added a nonfiction category, by way of experiment. We didn’t have many entries, and we never included nonfiction again. We only tried it out the one year.

One of the submissions in that category was not as polished as some, but the content was amazing, the sort of thing that makes you literally sit up and take notice, gasping, “Oh, my!” The writer’s story was riveting and had a broad appeal—which makes it marketable. I was one of the two judges, and neither of us had any doubt which of the entries should be the winner.

As contest coordinator, I contacted the contest participants to let them know if they won and to give them the judges’ critiques. When I contacted the winner of our nonfiction category, I told her that both judges thought the book had wonderful potential but was a little rough, and I recommended she try to find an editor or someone knowledgeable who could help her smooth it out.

She responded that she would love to do that, but didn’t really know anyone. However, she particularly liked the critique by one of the contest judges, and she asked if I would inquire if that judge would be interested in working with her.

That judge just happened to be me, and so I answered yes. I’d love to help you with this book!

And speaking of “just happened,” let me tell you about how she “just happened” to enter the contest in the first place:

She is the first to tell you, she is not a writer, but for quite some time, the Lord had been compelling her to write about her experiences. Originally it was all in journal form, but eventually she began to compile some of her journal entries into a book. It was a struggle for her, though, and she sought help along the way.

At one time she had contacted a writer in the US, but nothing had been decided between them as to whether or not, or how, they would work together on the project. She tells me that one evening, feeling compelled to get moving on it, she tried to find this writer’s email address but couldn’t locate it, so she did an online search for her.

Among the search results was an interview this writer had done on the Novel Rocket blog. My friend read the post but didn’t see anything there about how to contact her (which is surprising, because the Novel Rocket guests always provided that kind of information), and was just about to leave the page when the Contest tab at the top caught her eye.

Contest? What kind of contest? She clicked on it. Oh, look, there’s a nonfiction category! Let me see if I qualify. Oh, yes, my book sounds like just what they’re looking for. Now, how do I enter? Hmmm… Oh, my! The submission deadline is midnight tomorrow! So she hurried up and submitted her entry.

And that’s how this dear lady Down Under “just happened” to meet up with little old me on the other side of the planet. In the several years since all that transpired, we’ve been in frequent contact, both through emails and Skype. We’ve often talked about getting together in person, and now at last, everything’s coming together for that to happen.

And, in case you wondered, we’re still working on that book of hers. At a writer’s conference last summer, I spoke with some editors and agents about it, and they all suggested that it might be too short. Why? Because from a publisher’s point of view, it costs as much to produce a short book as it does a long one. You’ve got to pay editors, designers and formatters, etc., and you have all the same overhead as you do for a larger book. Yes, there’s a little less paper and ink in a short book, but overall, the costs amount to almost the same. However, consumers don’t like to pay the same amount for a skinny book as a thicker one. If a publisher prices a short book lower, they’ll lose money even if it sells; but if they price it higher, people won’t buy it. So publishers tend to be leery of contracting for short books.

When I told my friend that, she said she could easily expand it. And that’s what she’s been working on since then. I haven’t seen any of the additions yet, but our plan is get it all put together, polished up, and ready to publish—which I will then undertake to do on her behalf.

But that’s another story. For today, I just wanted to answer the question as to who I’ll be visiting.

So now you know!

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Seasons

We’re nearing the end of summer when the days are getting shorter, the temperatures are cooling just a bit, and the kids are going back to school.

That last item doesn’t affect me personally, as I have no school-age kids. But my oldest daughter is a college instructor, and my second daughter has five young’uns in school. And, of course, this is the time of year to stock up on office/school supplies, because they’re on sale everywhere! I always feel drawn to look at them even though I don’t need anything.

In an e-conversation with said eldest last week, I commented that the smell of fresh asphalt is, to me, the fragrance of the first day of school, as I associate it with the freshly resurfaced playground at my old elementary school. I used to like school in those days. I outgrew it, but early on, the first day of school was fun and exciting, so even today, the scent of fresh blacktop makes me smile.

Living in a temperate region as I do, I enjoy four seasons each year. And when I say “enjoy,” that’s exactly what I mean; all four are my favorites. There are some aspects of each that I love and some parts I’m less thrilled with. But before I’m tired of one season, the next moves in to take its place, so I sometimes say my favorite season of the year is one we’re just moving into.

Grandparenthood is a WONDERFUL season!

Life, too, has various seasons. In a way, these tend to be more of a progression than a cycle, because you only experience one fresh spring in your life, one prime of summer, one lovely autumn, and one final winter. But life offers other seasons too, which do repeat: seasons of challenge, of achievement, of rest, and preparation for the next round of challenges.

I entered a new season earlier this year, but I wasn’t sure what it was at first. Eventually I decided it must be a time of preparation. I don’t know what I’m preparing for, but in the last few months, I’ve felt compelled to spend more time in prayer and Bible study than ever before, so I figure there must be a reason for it.

I’ve also been reading a very interesting book that my friend in Tasmania recommended: Secrets of the Secret Place by Bob Sorge. Though I’ve been working my way through it for months now, I’m only halfway through, because I read a chapter and then contemplate it for some time before moving on.

Chapter 17 is “The Secret of Retreats,” and as I contemplated that topic some time back, I decided this season of my life must be a retreat of sorts. Though I’m not totally isolated, I’m home alone a good bit (which I love, by the way!), and being in an apartment, my housework is limited. Most mornings, therefore, I spend a few hours “in retreat” with the Lord, and it’s a delight.

But this time next month, I’ll have begun my season of traveling. First comes the ACFW conference in Grapevine, Texas, Sept. 20 – 24. Then I’ll leave again on the 30th for a three-week trip to Tasmania. I mentioned all this in my last blog post over a month ago, but the countdown is still ticking—and I’m still trying not to get so excited that I can’t think straight!

I’ll leave here at the beginning of autumn and visit the other side of the world where it will be spring. When I return home, all the leaves will have fallen, and everything will be dreary and brown and cold and damp. I’ll feel like I’ve been on a different planet. Sometimes it’s difficult to adjust to the changing seasons–especially when they change so abruptly.

I plan to post regularly during my travels because I’ll have plenty to talk about! In the meantime, though, I want to get in the habit of posting a little more often, so neither you my readers, nor I, go into shock at the sudden change. In order to do that, though, I’ll have to come up with some topics to write about. Hmm…

I’m not good at thinking. Any suggestions?

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

Summer Update

Yesterday afternoon, I fell, gasping, across the finish line of the writing project I began in September of 2015.

My new baby weighs in at a little over 242,000 words, but don’t worry; it’s triplets. I won’t call it a series, because it’s not a series of related stories. It’s one story that takes three volumes to tell, kind of like the Lord of the Rings.

(NOTE: the format is the only comparison between my project and Tolkien’s famous work. Mine does not approach LOTR’s scope or depth or creativity, and no languages or alphabets were created in the making of it. So don’t go telling people I told you it’s like Lord of the Rings. It’s not!)

I intended to publish the first book this spring. But circumstances have led me to believe I shouldn’t be in such a hurry, so I decided hold off for a while. But having the whole thing drafted at last makes me very happy.

Something else I’ve been talking about for a long time but have only recently made firm plans to accomplish: travel to Tasmania! I’ll be gone most of the month of October, which means I’ll have to miss one of my four favorite seasons here in this part of the world. But that’s okay, I’ve seen autumn before. (Quite a few times, in fact!) But I’ve never seen Tasmania before. And since I have an invitation, as well as the time, health, and means to go, it would be foolish of me to not take advantage of this opportunity.

This is a view of Tasmania from space. I won’t see it from this perspective, but it makes for a great photo

It won’t be the first time I’ve been out of the US, but the other times don’t really count. Back in 1975, a friend and I visited her aunt and uncle in San Diego, and while we were in the neighborhood, we popped in to Tijuana, Mexico one evening. I’ve also been to Canada several times, but only in the days before we needed a passport to go there.

This trip will take a lot more preparation than simply packing a suitcase and making sure there’s gas in the car. I’m doing the research and trying to be practical (like, calmly making a to-do list and checking off items as I complete them) and not think too much about how exciting the trip will be! Because if I think about it too much, I’ll be good for nothing.

I’m pretty much good for nothing anyway: it’s taken me a couple hours to draft this post, because I keep looking at things travelers should know about visiting Australia. (Their Department of State has a very useful website for that.)

I’ll keep you updated on the upcoming trip, and also my progress as I move toward publishing my new baby, The Four Lives of Jemma Freeman.

I originally called it The Four Lives of Jemima Freeman, but I realized  the name Jemima Freeman gives the wrong impression. This is a speculative story set on another planet and has nothing whatsoever to do with African Americans, but unfortunately, the name “Jemima Freeman” conjures up an image something like this

when actually, the character in question has nothing in common with this famous fictional lady, other than the first name. Because some of her friends call my character Jemma, I’ve used that nickname in the title of the series to try to avoid confusion.

I do like the name Jemima, though. Too bad it’s stereotyped.

 

I hope to have some publishing news for you before too long. Meanwhile, enjoy your summer! Unless you’re in the southern hemisphere, in which case, I wish you a happy winter.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter

The Porch Light is On

I recently started drafting a post on the subject of “coming home.” It was appropriate, considering that’s the title of the new novella collection in which one of my stories appears with six others.

Each story takes place in a different location (Texas, West Virginia, an island in Lake Superior off the coast of Wisconsin, Indiana, Georgia, one of the Carolinas [sorry, Kimberli, but I don’t remember which one!]*, and Ohio) all with the unifying theme being tiny houses. I don’t usually write contemporary fiction, but it’s been fun working with my friends on this project, and I enjoyed writing the story, which I set in the community where Craig and I lived for 30 years.

*[Note: Kimberli just contacted me to say: “This is one of the few stories I’ve written that doesn’t take place in the Carolinas. Like Linda’s, mine is set in Texas, only North Central Texas where it’s hot and dry and the town has been suffering a long drought. That part was based on an actual event. It was so dry in the real town my fictional town is based on, they pleaded with people to pray for rain. In the story, they got it. In buckets.” Sorry I mis-remembered, Kimberli, and thanks for the correction!]

And now, back to our regularly-scheduled broadcast:
Another reason “coming home” is so appropriate is because we recently moved, and when I return to this place after being away, I don’t quite feel like I’m “home.” This kind of surprises me, because when we moved to Maryland in 2013, my husband and I both immediately felt like our new house was home. Why don’t I now? I’m not sure, but it’s different this time.

Here’s a portion of the post I started drafting earlier but never finished:

Coming Home is the title of the novella collection a group of us recently published. In a way, it’s also the theme of my contribution to the book, though it was someone else who came up with the title.

It’s also what I felt like this past Wednesday when I went back for visit to the area of New Philadelphia, OH. That’s where my husband and I lived for 30 years. All four of our kids grew up there, graduated from high school in the area, and were launched into the world from that home base.

When driving back to T-County this past week, the closer I got, the more I found myself anticipating my arrival there. I felt like I was going home.

I dropped off copies of the book at both the New Philadelphia and Dover public libraries. I also delivered several copies to Dayspring Christian Bookstore, where they are now available for sale. I went to Swiss Village Bulk Foods and Sugar Valley Meats in Sugarcreek. I had lunch at my cousin’s house. The whole time, I drove around with a smile on my face.

I don’t ever expect to live there again, but it sure is nice to visit.

I got that far and then couldn’t think what else to say, so I put it aside. Until now.

This morning as I read in the Gospel of John, I got to the first verse in chapter 14 and pulled up short.

I’ll share that with you in a minute, but first, let me fill you in on something that happens in my novella. The main character has been going through a very difficult time. Her marriage has fallen apart, she’s moved out of her long-time home, she’s left her career, and is trying to start over in the community where she lived when she was a young girl. Subconsciously, I suppose, she hopes to recapture something of the hope and happiness of her youth. But she can’t find it, because those days are gone. She prays, but can’t seem to feel the connection with God she once did. She feels lonely and adrift.

At one point in the story, she’s out walking the dog after dark and gets a little scare. She looks toward her tiny house, and the lights beckon to her to come back to safety. As she and the dog move into the protective glow of the house’s deck light, she asks herself, “Stepping into the light of God can’t be as simple as walking back to the house, can it?”

That analogy came back to mind when I contemplated John 14:1. Here are the thoughts I recorded in my journal. (Please forgive my long, rambling sentences; I write these notes only for myself, not for publication!):

What the disciples were about to face—they didn’t know it yet, but Jesus did—was a horror of unprecedented magnitude. They were about to see the long-awaited Messiah, whom they knew to be God in the flesh, whom they had seen exercise supernatural power over everything (sin, death, disease, demons, storm winds, human authorities, physical laws), and in whom God would fulfill all His glorious promises to Israel—this One in whom they had willingly placed their lives, their hope, their faith—would soon be arrested like a common criminal and taken away, subjected to unjust trial, physical torture, and the most horrific execution mankind had ever devised, all without lifting a finger or a word to defend himself. It was more appalling than can possibly be described. And on the eve of this, Jesus tells them, “Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me.”

There is no difficulty, no trauma, no heartache we can possibly face in this world that falls outside that assurance: Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in Jesus.

Jesus knows what we’re going through; this is not a trite platitude. He knows full well, for he’s experienced it. Indeed, he goes through it with us. When we know Jesus, we know the way through it, because HE is the way (vv. 5-6).

I tried to depict this through my story, but John said it better. Jesus is the Light (John 1:1-5 and 8:12) that draws us to God. When we hear things bump in the night, when we see disturbing shadows in the darkness around us, when we’re filled with fear—and indeed, there are plenty of legitimately scary things in this world!—we can come into the Light. He’s always near.

This is not to minimize the dangers. Our troubles and fears may be horribly real, but they are not eternal; they’re not all there is. When we walk in Christ’s light, we can see the end of them.

Share this:
Share this page via Email Share this page via Stumble Upon Share this page via Digg this Share this page via Facebook Share this page via Twitter